Breastfeeding Positions

Breastfeeding Positions If you’ve begun nursing, you have probably undergone a few frustrating arm positions to try and hold your little one in the most comfortable spot. And while there are a number of ways to safely hold your baby while breastfeeding, mothers must be aware of the strain they could potentially be putting on their child’s neck.

We have collected a few safe breastfeeding holds that allow your little one to nurse comfortably without turning his or her neck.

 

 

The Cradle

Place your baby’s head in the crook of your arm and support their back with your forearm and bottom with your hand. This allows your little one to lie sideways while facing you, with your breast directly in front of them.

 

The Football

Position your baby under your arm like a football and support their head with your hand and their body with your forearm. Like the cradle position, this allows them direct breast access.

 

Breastfeeding Positions The Side

One of the more relaxing positions, this allows you to lie down on your side with your baby facing you. Use pillows to prop up your head and shoulder and nurse comfortably with your baby resting by your side.

 

 

No matter what position you choose, remember to always stabilize your child’s head and neck and speak with your lactation specialist to learn to best course for you. Every mother is unique and specific actions may be recommended for you and your child.

 

Happy Nursing!

How to Produce More Breast Milk

If you’ve begun nursing you’ve probably occasionally had one of the breastfeeding mothers’ biggest concerns: is my baby getting enough milk?

It is important to remember that there are only a very small percent of mothers who cannot produce enough milk for their child and there are always steps to take to help produce more.

However, if you are feeling like your milk supply is a little low there are a few suggestions that could help you increase.

 

How to Produce More Breast Milk

  • Take care of yourself: Drink enough fluids and eat healthily. Never try dieting while you’re nursing, especially in the beginning when you are still forming your breast milk supply. You and your little one need you to stay healthy!

 

  • Nurse regularly, for as long as your baby will nurse: Nurse as frequently as possible and as often as your baby is hungry. The more you nurse, the better for you and your little one!

 

  • Offer your baby both of your breasts while feeding: ‘Switch nursing’ is incredibly helpful as it helps your baby to feed longer. When your child begins to slow down their suckling on your first breast, quickly switch them over to the second. Then switch again when their suckling begins to slow, until you have offered each breast twice.

 

  • Gently massage your breasts as you nurse: This helps the richer, high calorie milk let down more easily and stimulates breast milk flow.

 

In most normal cases a mother will always be able to produce enough milk for their hungry baby; but it is always helpful to be proactive and talk with a specialist to see what your options are if you are looking to increase your supply.

 

Make sure to talk with your lactation consultant to find the best course of action that is right for you. Every nursing mother is unique and specific recommendations or steps may be necessary.

Breast Milk Storage

If you have decided to use a breast pump to ensure your child a nutritious feeding when you’re apart, you have probably begun wondering how to properly and safely store your breast milk. Your breast milk is the best source of nutrition for your baby and it’s full of components to help strengthen their health.

Make sure to protect its nutrients by using the appropriate containers and storing practices.

 

Breast Milk StorageWhat is the best type of breast milk storage?

Remember to efficiently wash your hands before pumping or handling breast milk. Once your hands are clean and dry, store breast milk in a clean glass or plastic container with a secure lid or cap. While there are specifically made breast milk storage bags, we would recommend against them if possible as they leak, spill, and are easily polluted.

DO NOT store any expressed milk in disposable bottles or bags such as plastic water bottle containers or zip-lock baggies.

 

How should I label and store my containers?

It is essential to label all breast milk storage with the date it was pumped and stored with a water-resistant ink and label. Place the container(s) in the back of the refrigerator or freezer and make sure not to store them on the door.

Never fill your containers to the brim: breast milk expands during cooling and freezing.

 

How long will my stored breast milk stay good?

Different storing methods, containers, and cooling systems will make exact storing times vary. However, there are a few general recommendations that can be put to use for healthy babies:

 

Using a refrigerator: Breast milk can be safely stored in the back of your refrigerator for 5-8 days.

Using a freezer: Breast milk can be safely stored in the back of your traditional refrigerator-freezer for up to 3-6 months.

Keeping at room temperature: Recently pumped breast milk can remain at room temperature for up to 6 hours. However, if the room is particularly warm the milk should be transferred to a refrigerator or freezer.

 

Is it safe to add fresh milk to previously stored breast milk?

Yes, although the freshly expressed milk should be cooled before adding: adding warm breast milk to cold will potentially thaw the already frozen or chilled milk.

Do NOT combine milk that is expressed from different days; store these separately.

 

Whatever option you choose, make sure to set up a meeting with your doctor prior to storing your breast milk. Specific steps and recommendations may be made that would be best for you as a mother.

Breastfeeding while Pregnant

Breastfeeding while pregnant is more than just safe, it’s natural. Your body is designed to work miracles when it comes to your children. Not only can you breastfeed while pregnant but, after birthing your second child, you can nurse both little ones at once. Breastfeeding twins or two different aged siblings at once is called “tandem nursing” and it is incredibly common and healthy.

 

Breastfeeding while Pregnant While pregnant, many women worry about producing enough nutrients for both their growing baby and nursling and fear they will have to drastically increase their food intake. In reality, our remarkable bodies only require a well-balanced, nutritious diet. If you’re feeling hungry then go ahead and eat! If you’re feeling thirsty then drink! Trust your body and give it whatever it needs.

 

There are a few side effects to consider if this is your first time breastfeeding while pregnant:

 

All of these are normal and should be expected:

  • Different looking and tasting breast milk
    • Towards the end of a woman’s pregnancy, her body will begin to produce thicker, yellowish milk which will stop after the first few days of a baby’s birth. This is called colostrum and it is both normal and healthy.

 

  • A slight lessening of your breast milk supply
    • Hormonal changes will cause a woman’s milk supply to slightly decrease most likely by the second trimester.

 

  • Nipples far more tender than normal
    • As many women gently massage their tender breasts and nipples for comfort, some soon-to-be mothers are worried that the stimulation will cause an early birth as it helps the body produce oxytocin (a hormone that plays a large roll in contractions). In truth, the oxytocin produced is not enough to cause an early birth during normal circumstances.

 

Make sure to always speak to your lactation consultant prior to nursing while pregnant or participating in tandem nursing. Every woman is unique and specific steps and suggestions may be recommended that are essential for you as a mother.