Pregnancy Myths: Part 1

Pregnancy Myths: Part 1When it comes to pregnancy and babies, everyone seems to have an opinion. Unfortunately, not all the unsolicited advice you get will be accurate, much less something you really want to heed anyways. Pregnancy myths are as common as morning sickness and swollen feet for moms-to-be. This week we’re debunking some of the major pregnancy myths so you can get to the bottom of what really matters in a healthy pregnancy.

Pregnancy Myth #1: You’re Eating for Two

You may feel a bit hungrier than usual but you actually don’t need much more food to sustain yourself and your growing baby. About 200 to 300 extra calories should do it. Many moms-to-be find it easier to graze on small meals throughout the day. This can curb pregnancy nausea and help keep your blood sugar levels stable.

As you progress throughout your pregnancy you may even find eating large meals difficult because your baby is compressing your stomach making it not able to hold very much at one time.

Overeating during pregnancy can lead to an excessive weight gain and a host of health problems for you and your baby during and after pregnancy. Physicians recommend a weight gain between 25-35 pounds for most women during pregnancy.

Pregnancy Myth #2: You Can’t Take Any Medications

There are plenty of OTC medications that are safe during pregnancy including certain pain relievers, antacids, cough medications and allergy decongestants. Check with your doctor to make sure you select something safe for you and your baby. You may be able to continue taking pre-existing prescription medications or may be prescribed a new baby-safe medication during pregnancy to relieve symptoms. If you were taking something that is not safe now that you’re pregnant, your doctor may be able to prescribe an alternative drug.

Also, pregnant women should get a flu shot for the protection of herself and her baby. The flu shot for expectant moms does not contain the live virus and is completely safe and recommended for moms-to-be.

Pregnancy Myth #3: Heartburn Means Your Baby Will Be Hairy

The old wives’ tale about heartburn and your baby’s likelihood for excessive hair is not exactly what it’s cracked up to be, although there may be some truth to it. Plenty of moms with heartburn give birth to bald babies, but sometimes the pregnancy hormones causing heartburn are the same that stimulate hair growth for babies. So, if your heartburn is indeed from your hormones and not the hot tamales you ate last night, your baby may be hairy…or he may not.

Pregnancy Myth #4: You Can’t Drink Coffee

Studies show that caffeine in moderation is completely acceptable during pregnancy. Previous research indicated caffeine may lead to preterm birth or low birth weight but this myth has been debunked. In fact, eating chocolate – a food with natural caffeine – is healthy during pregnancy.

Pregnancy Myth #5: Don’t Dye Your Hair

There is no evidence that the small amount of chemicals used to dye hair will affect your baby. It would take many times that level of toxins to do any harm to your baby and it certainly would have affected you long before your little one. If you need to touch up your roots or have a hankering for an entirely new hair color before your baby arrives, go for it.

Pregnancy Myth #6: You Should Always Feel Happy During Pregnancy

Sure, you’re excited, optimistic and eager to start a new life with your bundle of joy, but you may also be anxious, scared and stressed at the same time. Pregnancy hormones can leave you with a mixed range of emotions that are often confusing when you believe you’re supposed to just be thrilled about your baby all the time. Especially when pregnancy symptoms are at their worst, feeling happy isn’t always on your agenda.

Don’t feel guilty, these are normal feelings. Try to find a balance between everything you need to maintain in your life and supporting your physical and emotional needs at this critical time. Also, lean on your partner, friends and family to help you work through some of your feelings.

Pregnancy Myth #7: Carrying Low, Carrying Wide and Dark Nipples can Determine Your Baby’s Gender

All of these things may happen to you, but it isn’t an indication of the gender of your baby. Whether you find out your baby’s gender in advance of birth or not, your baby’s sex is determined at conception. Nothing that you do, say or believe is going to change that.

The way you carry your baby has much to do with your body type, your baby’s position in the womb, and your stomach muscles. If you have a shorter torso, your belly may protrude outward more because you have less “built-in” space for your baby. Stronger abdominal muscles tend to help moms-to-be hold babies higher. With each pregnancy your muscles may become more elastic and cause you to carry lower.

The darkening of your nipples is actually a wonderful way your body prepares for breastfeeding. It occurs due to hormones and some experts believe it is to help your baby, who has poor vision at birth, more easily find your nipples for breastfeeding.

If you’re shocked by these pregnancy myths, stick around for the second half of our series tomorrow!

Sources: WebMD, The Bump, Tommys, CNN, Parenting and Babble