Keep Your Breastfeeding Diet Pesticide Free for You and Baby’s Health

Keep Your Breastfeeding Diet Pesticide Free for You and Baby’s Health

There’s no set breastfeeding diet you should follow while nursing, but watching how many pesticides you consume should be a priority for any breastfeeding mom. Following these easy recommendations will keep you and your baby free from unnecessary chemical harm. Even if you can’t find everything organic at your local grocery store, there are additional ways to limit your family’s pesticide intake.

First things first: make sure to wash, scrub, and dry any fruits or veggies you’re planning on eating. The best way to make sure your produce is pesticide-free is to rinse any fruits thoroughly. After rinsing, take a paper towel and wipe away any leftover dirt before making your meal. Even if you purchase lettuce that’s pre-rinsed, it won’t hurt to throw it in a colander and quickly wash it again. Not only will this help protect you and your family against pesticide consumption, but diseases like listeria are often picked up through unwashed produce. Play it safe when it comes to your breastfeeding diet!

Summer is the best time to shop your local farmer’s market, and take advantage of any local produce you can purchase. Even if it’s not organic, there’s a better chance that your local produce carries less pesticides than fruits and veggies trucked in from a large-scale farm. Not only are farmer’s markets fun for the whole family, but you’ll be able to score sweet deals on fruits, veggies, and meats that you might not find in a traditional grocery store.

Keep in mind that the following fruits and veggies were deemed the “dirty dozen” by the Environmental Working Group 2011 study that looked at which food items contained the most pesticides on average: apples, celery, strawberries, peaches, spinach, nectarines, grapes, bell peppers, potatoes, blueberries, lettuce, kale and collard greens. When it comes to your healthy breastfeeding diet and these foods, take precautions for you and your baby. A little research goes a long way, so try to read labels and pick produce that is healthy for you and your baby.