Breastfed Baby Weight Gain

Many moms see their baby’s weight gain as a badge of honor because sometimes it is a result of the great efforts and long hours they’ve put into breastfeeding. While milk intake alone is not the only indication of breastfed baby weight gain, it is a significant part of the picture. Today we’re taking a look at average breastfed baby weight gain and the factors that influence your baby’s weight.

One of the biggest struggles for new moms who are breastfeeding for the first time is knowing whether or not their babies are taking in an adequate amount of milk. Because there are no measurement marks in breastfeeding, you Breastfed Baby Weight Gainhave to utilize other indicators including your baby’s weight gain, wet and soiled diapers and your baby’s level of satisfaction.

Keep in mind babies go through growth spurts frequently so even babies who are getting plenty of milk may feed more frequently than 2-3 hours. The number of times your baby may want to feed in a day is not necessarily a sign of low milk supply. And of course babies may be fussy for reasons other than being hungry so sometimes using mood as an indicator of breast milk satisfaction is not a true test. That’s why monitoring weight gain is so important to moms who breastfeed.

Average Breastfed Baby Weight Gain

According to Dr. Sears, most breastfed babies gain between 4 and 7 ounces in their first week, approximately 1 to 2 pounds per month for the first six months, and around 1 pound per month from six to 12 months. These are averages and may vary from baby-to-baby. Also, it’s important to remember that a 5-7% weight loss within three to four days after birth is completely normal. Usually if 10% or more weight loss has occurred, your doctor will recommend a breastfeeding evaluation to ensure your baby is feeding properly. This may include a visit to a lactation consultant who can evaluate your baby’s latch, positioning, milk supply and other potential barriers to breastfeeding success.

Most babies are weighted at least daily after birth during their initial hospital stay. Then they are weighed again at their first pediatrician appointment, which is usually five to seven days after birth. When determining your baby’s weight gain, consistency is crucial. Go by the weight indicated on the pediatrician’s scale when your baby is completely naked including diaper-less. Different scales can offer seemingly minor fluctuations, but with a newborn, every ounce counts. If you are concerned about your baby’s weight gain or lack thereof, you can ask to pop into your pediatrician’s office for a quick weigh in as necessary.

Other Factors that Influence Breastfed Baby Weight Gain

Body type and activity level also influence your baby’s weight gain. Babies who tend to be long and lean usually gain length faster than weight, which is still an indication of growth. Other babies are plumper and gain weight faster than length. If your baby is extremely active – whether rolling, crawling, cruising or walking – she will burn more calories and perhaps not gain as much weight as more sedentary babies. That doesn’t mean she’s not getting enough to eat, but rather she’s putting the breast milk to good use right away.

Additionally, babies who are breastfed on demand and sleep near their mothers during infancy are more likely to grow faster. They are easily able to eat frequently and let their mothers know when they need milk.

If you are concerned about your baby’s weight gain, consult your pediatrician and consider visiting a lactation consultant to ensure your baby is feeding efficiently.

Sources: Ask Dr. Sears and KellyMom

 

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